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days but it would take three long weeks for those ends to hatch. the civil rights movement taught me patience, to never give up and never give in but keep your eyes on the prize, so this book, "across that bridge," is about patience, about steady hope, truce, love and reconciliation. when i was growing up in alabama, visit the tuskegee and later starred in national tennessee and lived in alana. sissons salles white men, colored men, white women, colored women. when i was a child with my mother, father, parents and grandparents why? and they would say that's the way it is. don't get in the way. don't get in trouble. but 1955 at the age of 15i heard of rosa parks. i heard of martin luther king, jr.. at the age of 17 aye rosa parks. the next year at the age of 18i met dr. martin luther king jr.. the action of rosa parks to the people of montgomery and teaching the leadership of dr. king inspired me to get in the way to get in trouble so for more than 50 years i've been in trouble, unnecessary trouble. [applause] so, across that bridge is a lesson about getting in trouble, and that's wha
a better school. it also led in part to the landmark civil rights place -- decision, brown vs. board of education. my grandmother and her sisters realized early on that education was important for their survival. their unshakeable persistence and unflinching sacrifice led them to better lives. not only did they had -- have to do with racism but the belief that a woman's place was in the home and in this case on the farm doing the chores like cooking, cleaning, milking the cow and cutting wood. this is the 1930's. you have to cut wood for everything. as i mentioned earlier prince edward county was not interested in educating colored children but my grandmother and her sisters were persistent and found a school in the neighboring county of appomattox which was down the street from the courthouse where general robert e. lee surrendered to general ulysses s. grant that ended the civil war. once they found that school that had the next calabash task of convincing their father they should go to school. and the way they convinced him was by saying we will take care of the chores on the farm
filibuster in opposition to the civil rights act of 1957 and his movement from the democrat to the republican party in 1964. this is about 45 minutes. >> i want to talk to you today about my book, "strom thurmond's america" and i want to begin by telling you a story, a strom thurmond story and when you go and you do research in south carolina and you go into the archives to see what you are interested in about, you tell them strom thurmond and they say let me tell you my story about strom thurmond. that time they did something for him or they time they saw him do something crazy. my story about strom thurmond begins in late july, 1992 and i am on a flight from washington d.c. to charlotte, north carolina. i had been an internet intern that summer off on capitol hill and one of my regrets of the summer was that i had never seen strom thurmond because all of my fellow mentor said you have got to see strom thurmond. he such an unusual appearance about him and i did not know what they meant really. but i had my suspicions. so i'm on the flight and i look ahead in front of me and i see a man who h
, the civil war and the civil rights era, which brings this nuanced exploration into the 20th century. as we approach the sesquicentennial of the proclamation, wait brings to light how american writers brought their own perspectives to bear on the centennial of the war. how they grapple with the issues it raised unhealthy influence public number and commemoration of the word to varying degrees. the four writers from the southern novelist and essayist, robert penn warren to recant his view of the civil war is a lost cause midwestern historian bruce cotton causes her to norman rockwell come in part because his capacious works on the civil war were widely read at the middle of the century. northern utes in literary critic, edmund wilson looked at the war in terms of its own pacifism, often neglect in the role of race in it in the northern negro novelist james baldwin who is the most acute essayist and tinker in the american psyche hands down working at that time. blight said that all four, and i quote, are geared to say with america's tendency towards a progressive tribal sunny sense of history
on particular issues. >> on that one? on the issue of civil rights? >> i will absolutely differ from my party. i am pro-choice candidate, i believe in equal rights for all. i would have voted to repeal don't ask, don't tell. i don't think we should have discrimination in the military, the workplace or anywhere. >> our next question is to mr. murphy. >> knowing that voters form their opinions based on political ads, how can you justify airing ads that in some cases have been determined by fact checkers to be misleading, confusing, and downright inaccurate? >> the ads that you see on tv for me right now are me in my kitchen talking to voters directly about the differences between me and linda mcmahon on critical issues. i support a middle-class tax cut. when the mcmahon includes a tax cut for the very wealthy. when history is standing up for the people in the state, whether it's taking homeless veterans of the street and giving them housing or fighting for the most vulnerable and the roof over their head because of a disability or mental illness. linda mcmahon has used her job a very different way
they are at a disadvantage, i completely agree with kleiza rice that the civil rights issue of our day is school choice and the disaster of the public schools, it is a universal law of nature that everything run by the government will become worse and more expensive over time. everything that is sold on the private market will become better and less expensive over time. like flat screen tv's, cell phones. versus the post office, public schools, and amtrak food service. and by the way, our entire health care is now going to be put in the hands -- in the capable hands of the federal government. >> one more school thing. also from "the new york times." >> i disagree. >> you may not. four decades after clashes, bottom of the again debates school busing. nearly four decades after the city was convulsed by violence over court-ordered segregation, boston is working to reduce its reliance on busing at a school system now made up of largely minority students. although court-ordered busing ended more than two decades ago, only 13% of students in boston, 13% in the public schools, today are white. and the school
cannot segregate jobs by gender. in 1964 civil rights act outlawed it. judy was absolutely fabric ousted. they called the equal opportunities employment commission in washington and find it. so the next day she dialed the eeoc in washington and the woman said yes, that's legal. and she said i don't think the men know it's illegal. [laughter] she said why don't we just tell them? and the woman said, are you crazy? she said people in power don't want to give up power. they will promote -- she said to have a very clear case. you have to sue. so now judy had a moral issue. it wasn't just she wasn't being promoted, it was this is an illegal thing. and one by one she started talking to her friends. i was the fifth person that she spoke to. and we decided because we were terrified that we would be fired if anybody found out, that we each of us would talk to one other person who did talk to one of the person. and where do we organize? in the ladies room. that plays have tears in the organization. and so, we want by one got to be about 20 women on the staff when we realized we needed on the large
against violence and rape, for equal pay and educational opportunities. on behalf of civil rights and women's rights. we've shown a bright light on women's rights from the powerful economic interest that profit at women's expense to the relishes fundamentalist. in the fall issue of "ms.," we celebrate these 40 years of impactful reporting. from the very first issue, with the abortion petition signed by 53 prominent women who had abortions when they were illegal to repeal our abortion laws. nearly 15 years before anita hill's fame mouse testimony. to our ground beaking reporting that defined genital mutilation as an international crime against women. to our 1996 look inside the taliban's regime before most of the media had even noticed right up to our 2011 story declaring rape is rape in which we revealed the f.b.i.'s 80-year-old definition of rape under counted rapes in this country by hundreds of thousands every year. that was part of a larger feminist campaign and kicked off a fire storm resulting in 140,000 e-mails and letters to the f.b.i. and attorney general demanding the de
of republicans pushing civil rights legislation, antipole tax legislation, anti-link legislation. public accommodations legislation with the democrats constantly blocking, blocking, blocking and the tricks they use these were liberal democrats. they weren't conservative democrats. you just become so frustrated that i think nixon was absolutely right. you can hear the frustration in the speeches he gave about it he said the building trades have been given long enough to -- to -- to voluntarily integrate their work forces. if they're going -- i've had it now. if they refuse to hire black people, we're going to get results now. so i supported it back then i think he was right. >> let me just add one other person's thought on affirmative action and get your response and then we'll start taking calls. this is a piece in the "new york times" this morning by a gentleman by the name of thomas eppenshade. no longer separate equal race in college, an elite college admission and college life he's the professor in [ indiscernible ] he believes affirmative action is beneficial but doesn't believe the
for black civil rights. it was about american rights, about human rights, about the rights of the citizen of this nation. as i got older, they reminded me of the clear truth. there were blacks, whites, latinos and asians. there were a gay folks and street books all marching for justice in america. they told me that you need to remember this from the beaches of normandy were there were black folks and white folks and gay folks. you need to remember this. when people were fighting to expand, it everybody involved. we knew we were all in it together. deep and real african proper was true. if you want to go fast you go alone, if you want to go far you go to together. so now it is time we go together. the dream of america is still just as urgent. this is still just as real. we are not finished with this nation yet. the word of our founders, liberty and justice for all, are still as operational as long as there is a person in this country that does not enjoy the same rights as their brother or their sister when it comes to voting rights, when it comes to marriage rights, when it comes to civil
who became a civil rights champion and founded the united farm workers union. >> every time somebody's son or daughter comes and learns about the history of this movement, i want them to know that our journey is never hopeless. our work is never done. i want them to remember that true courage is revealed when the night is darkest and the resistance is strongest and we somehow find it in ourselves to stand up for what we believe in. >> after paying his respects to the widow of chavez, the president flew off to san francisco for a round of campaign events. >>> mitt romney is campaigning in virginia again today, in a major foreign policy address at the virginia military institute, he continued to blast president obama's leadership in the middle east, and offered his own view. >> when we look at the middle east today, with iran closer than ever to nuclear weapons capability, with the conflict in syria threatening to destabilize the region and violent extremists on the march, and with an american ambassador and three others dead likely at the hands of the al qaeda affiliates, it's clear t
, as the number of briefs that outline for a higher education, business officials, civil rights groups, that outlined support for the use of race at the university of texas, briefs that are in opposition. but broader public opinion, it appears only about a quarter of the u.s. population supports the idea of racial preferences in college admissions. by contrast, in the second set of figures, the blues set of figures, there is broad support among the same set of voters for preference in college admissions based on income. given these results, it is not surprising that ward connerly, who will be on the panel, has been extremely successful in his efforts to ban affirmative action based on race in a number of states. so far, the efforts are 546. -- five for six. five out of six times, voters, when given the option, have said we should and the option of racial affirmative action at colleges and public employment, including blue states like california, michigan, and washington. the second major problem facing affirmative-action, of course, is the legal issue, which will be joined in the fishe
moments in which people thought he should have shown more courage. >> there were. on civil rights he did not use the bully pulpit as well as he should have. >> rose: richard nixon said he was devious. >> yes. you can have in great quote that eisnehower was a more devious man than people realized and i mean that in the best sense of the word. and he was being sincere and wasn't being funny it is true, eisenhower was deef you in the best sense of the word. >> rose: devious in what way? >> well, he wouldplay dumb is one thi i love about the guy guy talkable about his confidence, once before a conference his aides are coming and saying mr. president you have to be careful, you have to be careful and eisenhower said don't worry i will just confuse them. and he did. and can you imagine a president today being intentionally kind of confusing and dim-witted, but it was useful for eisenhower. >> rose: something about they don't know how dumb i am or i am dumber than they think. >> he was quoted as a dumb bunny he is not, he used to reached mha but it was effectivto be underestimated and learned t
important civil rights cases to come before them in years. affirmative action for college admissions. we are going to break that down and much more after this. >>> former model olga created. she knows contents sells. she also launched a companion online magazine as an opening source important what's in. for more of "your business," sunday mornings, 7:30 on msnbc. i'm only in my 60's... i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. call and find out about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, it could save you thousands in out-of-pocket costs. call now to request your free decision guide. i've been with my doctor for 12 years. now i know i'll be able to stick with him. you'll be able to visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare pa
to ut. >> reporter: conservative groups say it's not just about getting in. the u.s. civil rights commission says studies show that using racial preferences can hurt minorities by starting them out near the bottom of their classes. >> if they're towards the bottom of whatever class they go to, they are much more likely to give up on an ambitiono major in science and engineering. >> almost a decade ago, then justice sandra day o'connor wrote a majority opinion that said that the university of michigan law school had a compelling interest in promoting class diversity and suggested affirmative action might still be needed for another 25 years. o'connor has since left the court, leading to speculation that the court's conservatives could now strike a blow to preferences. joe johns, cnn, washington. >> thank you, joe johns. so jeff toobin, this is the question. does this texas case raise any new and diinctive questions about this, about affirmative action, or is this one of those second bites at the apple, merely another opportunity for a different supreme court with brand-new justices
. in a "there was a country," ch right about civil war. and larry bowman in at the sumwalt writes about how wrong -- admiral zumwalt. look for these titles in bookstores this coming week and watch for the authors in the near future on both tv and at booktv.org. >> this month as the president of candidates debate, we are asking middle and high school students to send a message to the president as part of the studentcam video competition. in a short video, students will answer the question what the most important issue is in the campaign for 2013. it is open for students' grades 6-12. for complete details and rules, go online to studentcam.org. >> washington journal continues. host: in the segment we will talk about variety. our guest, melanie eversley joins us from new york. welcome. guest: thank you. host: we invited to specifically to talk about what has been happening in pennsylvania. what happened in that state concerning voter i.d.? guest: essentially, pennsylvania was a number of of states -- was one of a number of states across the country attempting to pass legislation that would req
important novel for african-americans to articulate civil rights. it exhibited an enormous influence not just and other writers but on leaving political figures and social activists. so without "uncle tom's cabin" you rich without strong, written very much to model. he wanted to model his work during the reconstruction era after "uncle tom's cabin." james baldwin famously in 1955 publishers the screen against "uncle tom's cabin." but for him, too, in the 1950s he says no novel has ever exerted over him like the power of "uncle tom's cabin." it's the sentimental power of this novel that last very much to the present day. >> watch booktv all weekend to see more of our recent visit to augusta, maine. for more information on this and other cities visited by booktv's local content vehicles go to c-span.org/localcontent. >> antonio mendez presents his book, "argo," at the international spy museum in d.c. arco details the story of six americans who escaped from the u.s. embassy during the iran hostage crisis in 1979. the cia operation to find and get them out of the country involved cia off
. >>> president obama's in california attending fund-raisers and honoring the late labor and civil rights actist cesar chavez. our white house correspondent dan lothian is traveling with the president right now. what's the latest areaction coming from the obama campaign? >> reporter: first of all, the president himself has not reacted to that speech by mitt romney. but last night at a major fund-raiser in los angeles, he was flexing his foreign policy muscles right off the top of his remarks, he was talking about how he ended the war in iraq, how he's winding down the war in afghanistan, how he's gone after terrorists, how he got osama bin laden. those are just some examples, says his campaign, of strong leadership. as president obama honored civil rights icon cesar chavez -- >> the movement he helped to lead was sustained by a generation of organizers who stood up and spoke out and urged others to do the same. >> reporter: his campaign worked to shred gop nominee mitt romney's foreign policy chops, rolling out this hard-hitting web ad reminding voters of what they called stumbles on the world s
is gone. it may never be seen again in the history of civilization and it's stored right here. without the voice of the cameras they would really have no voice and these landscapes would just disappear and nobody would be the wiser. it would be as if a tree fell in the forest and no one was there to hear the sound. it's the exact same conundrum. if a glacier melts in the arctic and there's no camera there to see it did it ever really exist? did it ever really happen? well, the cameras give life and voice to those processes and places. the scientific language that this story is told in is profoundly, profoundly, profoundly important. and it's what we build the pictures on. so i don't want to forget that. but then when you stack the visualization on top of the scientific understanding and then you marry those two things together, the art and the science, and you have something really powerful. >> when i saw the nasa satellite imagery of greenland i thought -- i honestly thought, "why doesn't jim balog let nasa do it? he doesn't have to take the risk anymore. this technology's doing what
be seen again in the history of civilization and it's stored right here. >>> james balog has come here from iceland and alaska with some urgency because what he has to tell us, barack obama and mitt romney simply refuse to talk about. welcome, james balog. >> i'm glad to be here, thank you. >> i've read the science on climate change. and then i read your book and saw your film and suddenly i more than get it. it gets me. does that make sense to you? >> yeah, it does. and that's the same reaction we've heard from many, many, many people across all parts of the philosophical and political spectrum. it really is this convergence of art and science that i think really hits people. and yeah, to be honest with you, having learned about these kind of sciences back when i was in my 20s, i tried to forget about the sciences for many decades. and i went off and saw the world as a visual artist. and then in this project i came back and really infused the science back into my thinking about, thinking and feeling about the world as an artist. and it turned out that this combination of art and scien
from latino civil rights leader caesar chavez. the president and national latino leaders dedicated a new national monument for chavez today. we have a flurry of new tv ads to dissect. we're going to get to at least a couple we hope. first one, let me ask you, michelle, the romney campaign released a new tved a with a liar argument. here is a part of it. >> president obama continues to distort mitt romney's plan. the latest not telling the truth about the tax plan. even the obama campaign admitted it wasn't true. >> jennifer: actually i'm going to ask this one of karl, because the romney campaign isn't telling anybody whether the ad is running. >> i think it's disenginous and ironic that they would release an ad calls lying, and not tell anybody where it is returning. if you want to give 20% tax cuts to every american that is $5 trillion. what is difficult is to get really detailed on romney's plans when they are not laid out specifically. so what you find from the fact checkers is that they are not being completely accurate but they always put in there the discl
at the tacoma, glenmont, u street and georgia avenue stations. several civil rights organizations are planning counter-ads. >>> a former cincinnati bengals cheerleader who admitted to having sex with a 17-year-old will not go to jail. sarah jones taught at the school where that teen attends and she has since agreed never to apply for another teaching job again. jones walked out of the courtroom actually hand in hand with that teenager. she's now working as a legal secretary. >>> the washington nationals are preparing for their first home playoff game after taking one on the chin in st. louis. jordan zimmerman got the start yesterday despite being 0-5 against the cards in the regular season. his bad luck against st. louis continued in the post season. zimmerman only lasted three innings giving up seven hits and five runs. the nats shuffled out seven different pitchers. as a group they gave up 12 runs. the cardinals crushed the nats 12-4. the series is at one game a piece. >> they got a split away from home and come home. do it in front of the home crowd instead. >>> encouraging news for the red
offenders and they are cunning and devious and to say their civil rights are violated, the first and 14th amendments, because they can't have a sign, you know, and halloween deck kra decorations to come into hair house, they've forfeited their right to have access to children. >> heather: and the attorney likening it to branding. and mentioning what they need to document let's look at the things required in the ordinance, or this law that was actually passed by the city of simi valley. first of all, a sign they have to post on their door, just says this, doesn't say i'm a sex offender, it says no candy or treats at this residence. they have to leave all exterior decorative and ornamental lighting off, 5:00 p.m. to midnight and, refrain from decorating their front yard and house exterior and don't answer the door to children trick-or-treating. >> essentially they are saying, you cannot try to lure these children. we know this is what you do. and we know you want children and know to -- sex with it i should say and you will not change your behavior and here, at the end of the day, when the
other political ends as i describe, it was always republicans pushing civil rights legislation, being blocked by democrats for five minutes in 1964 democrats pretended to care about black people, and then they just started slapping the civil rights label on causes having nothing to do with black people and, in fact, often opposed to black people. megyn: in today's day and age, i think the assumption is that democratic policies are better for blacks -- [laughter] because they believe in affirmative action, and today believe in sort of a hand up, and a lot of blacks are struggling in lower socioeconomic neighborhoods. and they believe democrats are empathetic to that situation. that's the line. >> that is certainly the line, and it is absolutely untrue. i mean, four years of obama there was an article going around yesterday on the drudge report that four years of obama has virtually wiped out the black middle class. that's just the economic point. never be fooled into thinking that what democrats care about is the poor, the elderly, minorities. what they care about are government sector
in the summer that year when the rising tide in the fight for civil rights swept across the nation. thousands of young people my age or heading to mississippi to try to break the back of segregation in the south. i was living in cambridge at the time. one day i simply got in my car. this was the 1916s. it was a little par. and i drove across town into the black community. i had never been in the black community before although i had grown up just outside of boston and i went to a minister, a wonderful man, some of you may recall his name. a revered figure in the black community and some close associate of dr. king and i asked him simply may i be of use? and he said yes, young man, you can. and he said i am glad you are here to talk to me in your own home town because you don't need to go to mississippi to find injustice in america. he said you can join the struggle here. come into schools and try to help our children. i walked into the headquarters of boston public school and said i am going to be a teacher. i had never heard of certification. i knew nothing about teaching. didn't teach anyth
. he missed out on the civil rights movement, and on the new left. but he determined to experience them vicariously. and so he tried drugs, as he confesses in his autobiography. he rallied against south africa, he gave political speeches, he community organized, he tried to get in touch with the black experience, and in general, he searched for meaning to use a formulation that he would not reject. in other words, he very much shared the '60s mood that everyone must find his own meaning in life. and find his own way in life. because there's no meaning out there, there's no objective source of meaning that one can point to or rely on. he shared the right to make history rather than to let it happen or trust it to redeem in justice in the own good time. and as well obama, i think, shared the post modernist suspicious that universal values, as he sometimes calls them, are not universal, and probably not true in any objective sense. one can see these ideas at work in dreams for my for, the heavily fictionalized autobiography or memoir he wrote. now politicians are known to lie. this is not
in the civil rights movement. one of the most tremendous people i have met in my life. she taught me a life. she died. a lot of us who will miss her terribly, pass on to her daughter tracy and her granddaughter maya you had a wonderful mother and grandmother and couldn't ask for anybody better. sweet woman. i know she is in especially looking down on us now. i'll -- she is in heaven looking down on us. i'll miss her very much. >> kimberly: very sweet. >> eric: i want to let everyone know david axelrod, yes, he did text me and said -- guess what? it's fundraising. over the weekend, yesterday, drew brees broke unitas 52-year-old record. do we have it? hopefully. >> wide open. there it is. drew brees to henderson. >> eric: all right. so the most games in a row with a touchdown pass bay quarterback. 52 years. brady has 37 games in a row currently. he is on brees' heel. good guy, by the way. >> kimberly: right? nice guy. class act. >> bob: visions of 180-degrees and he can see that. is why he is good. he goes back to here. it's amazing. remarkable player. >> kimberly: jets and whole quarterback
be an invasion of privacy. >> reporter: that's right, concerns over privacy sand civil rights. the sheriff's office is the one dringing this idea up, and it is very preliminary at this point. but here is a picture of a thrown that they tested just two months ago, that the office tested two months ago. a handful of law enforcement agencies in the country have gotten federal approval to use them. and if the sheriff's office does so, it would be the first in california. >> you'll be able to see what the drone is seeing as it's flying. >> reporter: at four pounds and four feet wide, this drone gets a bird's-eye view that officers on the ground are often blind to. >> it can save lives. >> reporter: in this demonstration in dub lick, it's a man standing in the shadows on a roof top with explosives in his reach. >> near priceless. it's valuable to any officer, as you're setting up your perimeters and knowing what the suspect may have in his hands, how the suspect is dressed, what are the avs of escape. >> reporter: the sheriff says his office would only use them during emergencies. >> pursuing a
in differences of civil rights, a lot of those who lived through this week over town, the best thing that george bush is that he is not ronald reagan. >> largely as result of policies and priorities of the reagan administration, more people are becoming poorer and staying for than any time since world war ii. >> if there's anything left of ronald reagan's trickle-down theory, it seems to be anxiety which seems to be trickling down to just about every segment of our society. >> if you gave clarence thomas all little flower, you would think -- here is a man who is against everything that has lifted the level of life of millions of blacks. >> i hope his wife feeds him mustard eggs and butter and he dies like many black men, of heart disease. that so i feel. he is a reprehensible person. >> you call to gingrich in your words trickle down terrorists who face their agenda on division, exclusion and fear. you think middle-class americans need protection from that group? >> the new republican majority took a big step today on the legislative agenda, to demolish or damage government aid programs. many of
.s. supreme court heard arguments today in the most important civil rights case to come before justices in the past six years. it's a challenge to the use of race as a factor in admissions at university of texas. >> and bay area students are watching this very carefully, and the uc regents are actively weigh inning. marianne favro is live with reaction tonight. >> reporter: here on campus a hearing today is resurrecting the debate over which factors should go into determining which students are aadmitted. it involves abigail fisher, a white woman that applied to the university of texas in 2008. she claims her race prevented her from getting accepted, and she's suing university. >> i hope the court rules that a student's race andette nis he city should not be considered when aapplying to the university of texas. >> reporter: the university of texas standing by it's policy. at san jose state we asked students if they thought race should be considered during admissions. >> it should be equal opportunity for everyone. >> i don't think race should be a factor in admissions because, you know,
. >> we're not being responded to a crisis that is now even to the point of a civil rights crisis. >> reporter: the issues revolve around the more than 1,000 units located off university boulevard in languageley park inside the bedford station and newborn square parts. they were acquired and out of town investment bank. it is managed by the group with offices in the west and midwest. >> partially bordered businesses are only part of it. they say they've had reports of lead poisoning due to the paint inside the apartments. bed bugs and other infestations. they're saying the only way to get management to respond to them is to take them to court. sandra lopez said her floors have been stripped to the support beams for a year now. the work to replace the floors started, then stopped. you can see through the holes in the floor to the apartment beneath because it is missing a ceiling. >> and one of the other men that live here, he was standing there and he almost fell through because of the huge hole. so that's what is covering that up. >> reporter: then there are the complaints about t
. the baltimore circuit courthouse is naaeddafter him, the latt civil rights leaderr and loobyist for the naacp." mitccell's 25- year political career came to an end after peddling in 1987.he ended up spending a year aad a half in friend:"to be honest with you, i don't think it did change him. i think, for a brief but, hh was alwwys there to . - &plend aavice."mitchell's legac continues witt his family... many involved in public life. his son, cllrence the foorth,, was lso a state leeislator... he nowwhostt the c-4 radio show in baltiiore.dee. keiffer kennedys,' what e had termed "the mitcheels, to a certain royaltyy"his son spoke abouu him today on the radii, &pfittingly channeliig bobby pennedy.c4 on radio:: &chhanelinn bobby kknnedy) "ddn't make my father larger actually was. he saw wrong and triid to right it. he saw pain ann tried to heal it. and, he saw racism and tried to stop it."mitchell was 72 years old. paul gessler, fox45 news at ten. ffneral plans.... have... not yet... been madee 3 3 &p3 &p3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 p3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 &p3 i got my obamaphone obamaphooe i got my ob
interfaith and civil rights groups have reached out to metro. >> to ask the transit authority to respond in a positive way, not by censoring, but by working with the arab american and muslim community, promoting mutual understanding, perhaps through another ad campaign that would counter the hate message in this campaign. >> metro officials don't give away ad space anywhere, but if care or any other group wants to counter this message with one of their own and a space becomes available, they are free to do it. they have to pay for the ad. >> and where in my message does it say muslim? >> but cares hooper says it is certainly implied. >> if she wants to spew hatred, she is free to do so in america, but it's up to the rest of the society, the mainstream practitioners to come together to repudiate hatred and promote mutual understanding. >> those posters did not go public without a fight. metro wanted to hold off, but the ads had to go up now. it was concerned about public safety and adding fuel to the fires burning recently. so far, reaction here has been muted. brian. >> bob tonig
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